Communications Department
202.626.8825
mediarelations@nrlc.org

Kansas, Idaho Legislatures Vote to Protect Pain-Capable Unborn Children

Mar 23, 2011 | 2011 Press Releases

WASHINGTON — Today, legislative houses in two states voted for bills that would protect pain-capable unborn children from death by abortion. This evening, the Kansas Senate, by a vote of 24-13, passed the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act. It is expected to be signed by pro-life Governor Sam Brownback as early as this week, making Kansas the second state in the country to protect these young, pre-born children. Also today, the Idaho Senate passed similar legislation by a vote of 24-10. It now goes to the Idaho House for consideration. The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, the landmark law that was first enacted last year in Nebraska, protects unborn children from abortions from 20 weeks after fertilization based on documented scientific evidence demonstrating that they can feel pain.

“Kansas and Idaho are the latest states to follow Nebraska in recognizing that unborn children feel pain and in moving to protect them,” said Mary Spaulding Balch, J.D., State Legislation Director for the National Right to Life Committee.

Several states are considering similar bills which recognize a state’s interest in protecting the life of an unborn child who is capable of feeling pain. Today, hearings were held in Alabama’s House Health Committee. On Monday, the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act will be heard in the Oklahoma Senate Health and Human Services Committee.

Documentation on the medical research can be found at http://www.doctorsonfetalpain.com

Pro-life legislation, including the Unborn Child Protection Act, has been a priority in many states across the country for the 2011 legislative session.

“We’ve seen pro-life legislation sweeping across the country this year,” said Balch. “The state has a vested interest in these unborn lives and many states are actively working to promote life-affirming and protective laws, such as the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act.”