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Ohio: First in the Nation Congressional Primary

by | Mar 8, 2012

By Karen Cross, NRL Political Director

Ohio Pro-abortion Sen. Sherrod Brown (left) and Republican pro-life challenger, State Treasurer Josh Mandel

The nation’s first congressional primary was held in Ohio as part of “Super Tuesday.” As a result the nominees for the Senate are now official and there will be changes in the makeup of the Congressional delegation due to the impact of redistricting and defeats.

Pro-life state Treasurer Josh Mandel won the GOP nomination to challenge pro-abortion incumbent Senator Sherrod Brown (D). This will be one of the marquee matchups as Republicans push to make a net gain of four [in the Senate to assume control.

Pro-life Rep. Jean Schmidt was defeated by pro-life Dr. Brad Wenstrup in a surprise loss for the Republican nomination in Ohio’s second congressional district. Ms. Schmidt was first elected to Congress in a 2005 Special Election.

Ohio lost two congressional districts, because of changes due to the census. In Ohio’s newly drawn ninth congressional district, two incumbent Democrats ran an intense primary battle.

Rep. Marcy Kaptur, who has a mixed record, easily defeated pro-abortion Rep. Dennis Kucinich in the first of what will be thirteen member versus member races across the nation.  Rep. Kaptur’s general election opponent will be pro-life Republican Sam Wurzlebacher, also known as “Joe the Plumber,” who won the GOP primary.

Another member vs. member race will take place in Ohio in the November general election. Pro-life Rep. Jim Renacci (R) and pro-abortion Rep. Betty Sutton (D) will square off in Ohio’s 16th congressional district.

Ohio’s congressional primary was the first. Next week Alabama and Mississippi will hold theirs.

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Categories: Politics