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Pain-Capable Abortion Ban to be Introduced in Ohio

by | Jan 29, 2015

 

60 Percent of Americans Support 20-Week Ban when babies can feel pain

feelpainCOLUMBUS, Ohio—On Tuesday, Ohio Right to Life announced landmark legislation that will ban abortions in Ohio at 20 weeks gestation, the point during pregnancy at which pre-born children can feel pain. This legislation, which is similar to National Right to Life’s Pain-Capable legislation, will be introduced in the Ohio General Assembly in the coming weeks.

“Our Pain-Capable legislation will alter the abortion debate in Ohio,” said Stephanie Ranade Krider, executive director of Ohio Right to Life. “An overwhelming majority of Americans, especially women, support protecting pre-born babies from scalpels and dismemberment. This is priority legislation for Ohio Right to Life and once again, the nation is watching.”

In November 2014, The Quinnipiac University Poll found that 60% of Americans would support prohibiting abortion after 20 weeks, while only 33% opposed such legislation. Women voters strongly support such a law by 59-35%, while independent voters supported it by 56-36%.

Currently, at least 275 facilities in the U.S. offer abortions past 20 weeks, using a variety of techniques, including a method in which the unborn child’s arms and legs are twisted off with a long stainless steel clamping tool.

“This strategic pro-life legislative initiative will save lives and guarantee Ohio remains at the forefront of the national pro-life movement,” said Krider. “No state in the nation has accomplished as much as Ohio to protect women and their pre-born children as evidenced by the historic low number of reported abortions tracked by the Ohio Department of Health. Our Pain-Capable bill will ensure that we continue this life-saving trend.”

Together with their constituents, the Ohio legislature is responding to our babies’ pain, extending empathy to the most vulnerable among us and saying ‘enough is enough,'” said Krider.

Categories: Legislation