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“Hey, can I see my fetus?”

by | Jun 19, 2015

By Dave Andrusko

unbornhumanfetus20weeksAs the last post of the week, I’d like to tag something onto a story I wrote yesterday which was titled “Two pro-abortionists ‘fantasize’ about a ‘holistic’ approach to abortion.”

You may recall it was a goofy interview given by two women involved in a pro-abortion organization named “Shift,” as in shifting everything, but most of all about how people collectively think about abortion. The line that drew the most response was this quote and my follow up comment:

So this is where I see: Oh, we’ve got to tell a more nuanced story about why we do this work. What is this work? It’s not just uterus-emptying. But we’ve got to be able to talk about the service. And our avoidance of it? People see it. They see it so clearly. I want to, behind the scenes at first, work on our stuff. So that we don’t leave what my friend Charlotte Taft calls the “crumbs at the picnic.” We have a picnic and we don’t clean up and anti-choicers grab every little crumb. Abortion, money! Ooh, “late-term” abortion! Fetal pain! Oh, sex-selection! I could make a list of all the things that all of us are terrified of being asked about. That’s totally by design.

To which I responded

“Crumbs at the picnic”? The oodles of money the abortion industry makes, the corrupt abortionists, the grim truth that babies are aborted because they are girls, are aborted virtually up until birth, and are killed in procedures so violent, so vicious, and so inhuman that we would NOT allow to be used on an animal. “Crumbs at the picnic”?

What I didn’t make clear at all is that Whole Woman’s Health’s “flagship abortion clinic”

has been reincarnated as an organizing and co-working space called ChoiceWorks, the operational headquarters of a new nonprofit from Whole Woman’s Health CEO Amy Hagstrom Miller: Shift.

It can be described in a lot of ways. “Showroom” would be one. Remembering this place is supposed to be a kind of welcoming facility where the ugliness of abortion is bleached out.

Consider these amazing paragraphs from Miller:

I noticed years and years ago that the only people talking about abortion in public were the people who were against it. We would have people in our clinics who would say, “Not only did I have a great abortion experience, but this is the best health-care experience I’ve ever had. But it’s at an abortion clinic.” And they would articulate: “I feel so empowered, I made the right choice, I feel affirmed.” So they have this great, empowering experience and they walk out the door and there’s just silence on the issue. Nobody’s talking about abortion as though it’s a good in our society, or as though good women would have an abortion. I had this banner outside Whole Woman’s Health for years that said, “Good women have abortions.” People flipped out.

Inside our clinics, we talk to people and say, you know, there’s no one right way to have an abortion. People say, “Hey, can I see my fetus?” And we’re like, sure. They say, “I wanna baptize it.” Sure. Let’s do it. Let’s figure it out.

After a moment of stunned silence, I thought about what to say, as I’m sure you did. But for now, remember who it is that we do battle with.

Not the women who get suckered into aborting their children, but the entrepreneurs like Miller.

Categories: Abortion
Tags: abortion