NRL News
202.626.8824
dadandrusk@aol.com

Baby born with Down syndrome “born to make people smile”

by | Mar 29, 2016

Mom says, “I felt lucky. I’d wanted a baby girl and now I had a baby girl and an extra chromosome, too.”

By Dave Andrusko

Kathryn Witt, 26, said she thought the image of Florence might get 'a few likes' from family and friends, but said she was shocked to see it had gone viral.

Kathryn Witt, 26, said she thought the image of Florence might get ‘a few likes’ from family and friends, but said she was shocked to see it had gone viral.

It’s schizophrenia on steroids.

The British publication, The Daily Mail runs an adorable feature on Florence, a baby with Down syndrome whose picture posted on Facebook has not only been seen 185,000 + times but convinced her Mom that this little girl “was born to make people smile.”

And then, near the end of the story, a sidebar in which we read about a “SUPER-SAFE AND 99% ACCURATE: NEW BLOOD TEST FOR DOWN’S,” a condition, we are told, that “causes learning disabilities and other problems. …” Depending on the study, anywhere from 65% to 90% of babies prenatally diagnosed with Down syndrome are aborted.

Aye yai yai.

Back to Florence and her mother, Kathryn, who told Kim Willis of the Daily Mail, “The new test is a real shame. A world without kids like Florence would be a less happy world. I wish I could say to parents who are scared or wondering if they could cope, come and meet Florence.”

Florence was born in May 2015. Her Facebook image has attracted more than 1,000 comments

Kathryn said of Florence, born at 5lb 4oz,

‘I haven’t stopped smiling since the day Florence came into my life.

‘She’s made my family complete. Since the photo went viral, I still get messages from people all over the world telling me she’s made them smile too.’

Kathryn told Willis that she thought Kathryn’s image might get ‘a few likes’ from family and friends, but said she was shocked to see it had gone viral. But the heart of the story is not how much Florence has brightened so many people’s day, although that is a blessing. It is how Kathryn refused to be discouraged by more and more evidence that Florence would have Down syndrome.

Already the mother of two boys, she desperately wanted a girl. So she simply deflected concerns that her unborn baby was small, asking instead if the baby was a girl. For example, as Willis wrote,

Kathryn said: ‘My consultant had a question for me to. Every scan, he’d ask me why I’d declined the nuchal fold test that could indicate if the baby had Down’s Syndrome.’

Every time, Kathryn had the same answer.

‘It made no difference to me if my baby had Down’s Syndrome or not. As an auxiliary nurse, I knew how much love and joy a child with Down’s syndrome could give a family. That’s why I’d declined the test. If my child had special needs, I’d give her extra love.’

You really should read the full story.  Let me close with a lengthy but lovely quote from Willis story. When Florence was born, Kathryn said

‘I said hello to my little girl, then looked up at Dan and burst into tears. I kept thanking him for giving me my perfect baby.’

‘She had a nose like mine and had Dan’s lips. She was a little bit of us both. As Florence opened her eyes and peered up at me, I recognised the almond shaped eyes that characterises Down’s Syndrome.

‘I knew then that she’d be diagnosed. But the rush of love didn’t change. The smile stayed plastered to my face because nothing had changed about my feelings for my baby. I was still so happy.’

Kathryn added: ‘I felt lucky. I’d wanted a baby girl and now I had a baby girl and an extra chromosome too.’

Tip of the hat to LifeNews.

Categories: Down Syndrome