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Ahead of Supreme Court hearing on abortion pill, U.S. bishops call for ‘focused effort of prayer’

by | Mar 19, 2024

By Dave Andrusko

With oral arguments on the first major abortion case to reach the Supreme Court since Dobbs overturned Roe v. Wade just a week away, the United States Bishops are inviting Catholics to join a focused effort of prayer” for “the end of abortion and the protection of women and preborn children” starting on March 25.

“The prayer campaign — which will begin on the anniversary of St. John Paul II’s pro-life encyclical Evangelium Vitae (The Gospel of Life) — will invoke the intercession of St. Joseph under his title “Defender of Life,” Daniel Payne reports for CNA. “We ask Catholics to offer this prayer daily, from March 25 through June, when a decision is expected,” the bishops wrote.

Oral arguments in Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine v. FDA will be heard March 26.

In a letter this month, U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) president Archbishop Timothy Broglio and USCCB Committee on Pro-Life Activities chairman Bishop Michael Burbidge said they were “inviting Catholics to join a focused effort of prayer” for “the end of abortion and the protection of women and preborn children” starting on March 25.

“We ask Catholics to offer this prayer daily, from March 25 through June, when a decision is expected,” the bishops added. 

 According to Lisa Bourne

In FDA v. AHM a group of pro-life doctors and organizations challenge the FDA’s decision to remove key health and safety measures from the prescribing requirements for chemical abortions. The Supreme Court will decide whether the FDA violated the Administrative Procedures Act when it changed the REMS (Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies) for the chemical abortion regimen.

 

The chemical abortion regimen consists of two drugs, mifepristone and misoprostol, the first drug working to block progesterone in a pregnant woman’s system, starving her unborn child of nutrients, and the second drug causing her to go into labor and deliver her presumably deceased child.

 

Pro-life medical professionals and advocates argue that the approval process for mifepristone in 2000 was rife with politics, rushed, and below standard.

The bishops said that FDA, by allowing the pills to be sent through the mails, “has enabled a nationwide mail-order abortion industry and turned neighborhood pharmacies into chemical abortion providers.”

Those pills “are now the most common form of abortion in the United States,” the bishops pointed out in their letter.

The Supreme Court’s ultimate decision on the matter, the bishops noted, “has the potential to make a major impact in the widespread accessibility of chemical abortion.”

“While the Supreme Court case is not about ending chemical abortion, it can restore limitations that the FDA has overridden,” they wrote.

In 2022, several groups and individuals, represented by the Alliance Defending Freedom, sued the FDA.

Texas judge Matthew Kacsmaryk agreed and suspended the FDA’s approval of mifepristone on the grounds that the agency had “acquiesced on its legitimate safety concerns” and approved the drug “based on plainly unsound reasoning and studies that did not support its conclusions,” Payne wrote.

The pro-abortion Biden administration appealed to the 5th U.S. Court of Appeals which partially upheld Judge Kacsmaryk’s decision.

“In a 7-2 decision, the Supreme Court temporarily blocked Kacsmaryk’s ruling and returned the case to the 5th Circuit for full review, leading to the ruling in August, which will be the subject of the Supreme Court’s March hearing.” Payne reported.

Categories: Supreme Court