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Trump’s Republican voters are more enthusiastic about supporting his candidacy than Democrats are about supporting his Democratic opponent, President Joe Biden

by | Mar 26, 2024

By Dave Andrusko

It should come as no surprise that the race between pro-life former President Donald Trump and pro-abortion President Joe Biden has ebbs and flows. Before moving into some of the details, it’s worth remembering that the public is deeply skeptical that the President is up to leading the country for four more years and that on the major issues Mr. Biden trails Mr. Trump, in some cases by huge margins [immigration and leadership].

Mr. Trump leads Mr. Biden “by 5 points (41%-36%) over a five-candidate field in the poll, and his presidential approval rating tops that of Biden right now: 55% say they approve of the job Trump did as president, a figure that is 10 points higher than Biden’s current approval rating of 45%,” Newsmax reports. The headline for Eric Mack’s story is “Harvard Poll: Trump Leads by 5; 63% Say Biden Too Old.”

On the other hand, Trump led by “just 2 points over Biden in a hypothetical head-to-head, with roughly 9 percent of voters undecided.”

Mack offers several other important topline findings:

  • A 58% majority said the U.S. is on the wrong track under the Biden administration, compared to 34% who said it is on the right track.
  • 56% said the U.S. economy is weak under Biden.
  • A plurality of 47% said their personal finances are getting worse under Biden.
  • Biden’s State of the Union speech provided no increase on his 45% approval rating since the last poll.
  • A majority of 52% had an unfavorable opinion of Biden’s State of the Union speech, with majorities saying he did not address the issues their family cares most about (54%) and “failed” to present solutions of their family’s issues (55%).
  • 56% said the Democrats are using “lawfare” to take out their chief political opponent.

But “President Biden has narrowed the gap against former President Trump in six out of seven key battleground states over the past month, according to a poll that hints at a likely close general election race between the two men in November,” Brett Samuels reported. “A Bloomberg News/Morning Consult poll published Tuesday found Biden still trailing Trump overall among all voters in the seven battleground states likely to determine the outcome of the election.”

Byron York interviewed Mr. Trump and came away with some telling comments. “At any given moment, there are lots of subjects in the news one could ask Trump about, but I decided to focus on a longer-term story — how he managed to come back from the disastrous end of his presidency in early 2021 to become the 2024 Republican Party presidential nominee. “It’s really a story about the intensity gap between Trump’s supporters and everybody else,” York wrote.

“At any given moment, there are lots of subjects in the news one could ask Trump about, but I decided to focus on a longer-term story — how he managed to come back from the disastrous end of his presidency in early 2021 to become the 2024 Republican Party presidential nominee. It’s really a story about the intensity gap between Trump’s supporters and everybody else.”

Remember that after Trump left office on Jan. 20, 2021, he was still awaiting a Senate impeachment trial (his second), Washington was reeling after a series of failed election challenges and Jan. 6, he was facing all sorts of investigations, and much of the political world had written him off for dead, “rebuked by many in his own party and exiled at his Florida estate Mar-a-Lago,” in the words of a recent New York Times story. 

But Trump saw, and felt, something completely different. Here’s the short version of what he told me during our conversation in Florida: He never felt politically dead. He knew he could run again. He was already planning it when he returned to Mar-a-Lago. He knew he had the support to do it because he could feel the emotional engagement of his voters.

“I feel the crowd, and I feel a love,” Trump said. “I never felt that [I was finished politically]. Just never felt it.” …

What Trump was feeling was an intensity gap. In the Republican primary race, more GOP voters were emotionally committed to him than to any GOP challenger. And now, in a general election matchup, those same Republican voters are more enthusiastic about supporting his candidacy than Democrats are about supporting his Democratic opponent, President Joe Biden.

You can read the full interview at The Washington Examiner.

Categories: Donald Trump